Is disruptive health technology misbehaving?

October 2017


Artificial intelligence, robotics, and nano-devices, among other rapidly expanding technologies have an overwhelming potential to shape many aspects of our not too distance future, not least our medical care.

With somewhat ease, we can now visualize a future with automated referrals, prescribing, monitoring and discharge – streamlining and synchronizing the care we receive.

However, it will be critical that such advances do not undermine what behavioural science and psychology have cemented over the last half century: that, contrary to standard economic theories, humans are not always rational. How we make decisions, such as whether to take a medicine, are complex and multi-factorial.

Consultations can often be key to ensure the optimal decision is reached. However, with automated services such as robotic drug dispensing, such human-human interactions will be lost.

Devices do not always have to be ‘unhuman’ though; many have been designed to be behaviourally smart. Such devices consider the irrational facets and individual complexities in human behaviour to improve outcomes and help people make better decisions for healthier, happier lives.

With the expanding accessibility of big data there is also a new opportunity to take advantage of, as quantitative behavioural insights and analysis can facilitate increasingly tailored and personalized support through medical devices.

Incorporating an understanding of human behaviour into artificial intelligence and other innovative medical devices will be vital in future healthcare, but done correctly could offer great potential to improve health outcomes.